Verizon & Nokia demo “5G NR” transmission on a “commercial network”

Verizon and Nokia have completed the first over-the-air, end-to-end “5G NR” data transmission on a commercial 3GPP 5G New Radio (NR) network, the companies announced. The transmission was between commercially deployed Nokia radio equipment and Verizon’s 5G network core and millimeter wave spectrum to a Nokia test van parked in the downtown area of Washington, D.C.

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Editor’s Note: 

“5G NR” is based on 3GPP release 15 spec, whereas it’s 3GPP release 16 (with parts of release 15) which will be submitted as a candidate IMT 2020 Radio Interface Technology (RIT) at the July 2019 ITU-R WP 5D meeting. Also, we don’t consider an end to end transmission using only Nokia endpoint terminals a “commercial network,” which is one in which there are many paying customers and endpoint terminals from several vendors (not just Nokia).

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Verizon and Nokia said that the transmission was another of their ongoing demonstrations of 5G NR technology. They expect to launch commercial 5G mobile service in 2019. In June, the two companies completed a series of outdoor data sessions over the 5G NR standard, and used multi-carrier aggregation to boost those signals into the gigabit-per-second range. Last month, Verizon and Nokia said they completed the first successful transmission of a 3GPP NR 5G signal to a receiver in a moving vehicle.“The cadence and frequency of these significant milestone achievements from Verizon and Nokia show just how quickly we’re taking the promise of 5G technology from the lab to the field and to the marketplace where our customers will ultimately use this revolutionary technology,” said Bill Stone, Verizon vice president, technology development and planning, in a prepared statement. “We said Verizon will be first to 5G, and our latest milestone moves us closer to fulfilling that promise.”

“Nokia and Verizon have had a tremendous summer for 5G innovations and technology advancements,” said Marc Rouanne, Nokia president mobile networks, in a prepared statement. “We are thrilled to be on the forefront of this new technology, helping Verizon make yet another significant stride towards becoming the first-mover to the market.”

The announcement followed Verizon and Nokia last month transmitting a pre-standard 5G signal between two radio sectors to a moving vehicle, calling the successful trial a “major 5G milestone”.

Verizon earlier announced it would launch 5G residential broadband service in Los Angeles, Sacramento, Houston and Indianapolis, in the second half of this year (based on Verizon’s proprietary spec), to be followed by a mobile 5G solution.  That’s all before the ITU-R IMT 2020 standards are finalized in late 2020.

References:

https://www.verizon.com/about/news/another-verizon-first-verizon-and-nokia-complete-first-over-air-data-transmission-commercial-5g

https://www.telecompetitor.com/verizon-claims-first-5g-nr-data-transmission-on-a-commercial-network/

https://www.zdnet.com/article/verizon-trials-5g-in-washington-dc-with-nokia/

 

3 thoughts on “Verizon & Nokia demo “5G NR” transmission on a “commercial network”

  1. Sprint, Nokia to Demo First Live 5G NR Connection over Massive MIMO

    Sprint and Nokia announced the companies will demo the first live U.S. 5G NR connection over a Massive MIMO radio at Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles this week.

    The demo will utilize Sprint’s 2.5 GHz spectrum, Nokia’s commercial AirScale Baste Station and Massive MIMO Active Antenna, and a Viavi TM500 5G test device emulator.

    The companies said the system using a dual mode-capable Massive MIMO antenna can support up to 120 MHz of spectrum in the 2.5 GHz band. Peak downlink speeds are expected to hit up to 3 Gbps for a single sector over both 5G and LTE simultaneously using Sprint’s spectrum. Sprint said this enables the carrier to offer both 4G LTE and 5G on the same radio.

    https://www.ecnmag.com/news/2018/09/sprint-nokia-demo-first-live-5g-nr-connection-over-massive-mimo

  2. WSJ: Inside Verizon’s 5G Game Plan

    CEO Hans Vestberg discusses what 5G will mean for consumers and why Verizon remains focused on its network

    Verizon plans to roll out the next, faster generation of wireless networks, or 5G, for its residential customers in four cities before the end of the year. The carrier said Tuesday that customers in Indianapolis, Houston, Sacramento and Los Angeles will be able to sign up for its 5G broadband internet service later this week, with installations starting Oct.1. The service uses higher-frequency spectrum known as millimeter waves, which can carry more data than other types of spectrum but can’t travel as far or penetrate many hard materials.

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/verizons-5g-game-plan-1536673535

  3. Verizon is readying the launch of its 5G Home service on Oct. 1 in Indianapolis, Houston, Los Angeles and Sacramento, Calif., and is rolling out preorder deals that will include three months of free YouTube TV and a free Apple TV 4K or Google Chromecast Ultra Device. Verizon’s proprietary 5G TF standard will be used for the initial launch, and services will run on the Verizon 5G Ultra Wideband network.

    The cost will be $50 for customers who have a qualifying Verizon Wireless service or $70 a month for non-Verizon Wireless customers. The company will begin taking orders on Thursday.

    First On 5G is something Verizon is referring to as a membership program that potential customers can sign up for online in order to receive updates about when Verizon 5G Home is coming to their area and when Verizon 5G mobile service launches.

    The Ultra Wideband 5G name will denote service operating in the millimeter wave spectrum band, including Verizon 5G Home. Verizon called that band “the only spectrum with the bandwidth to realize the full 5G potential for capacity, throughput and latency.”

    “To deliver the full potential of 5G, a wireless network provider must have three fundamental assets: deep fiber resources, a large deployment of small cells and critical spectrum holdings,” said Kyle Malady, Verizon chief technology officer, in the press release. “That’s Ultra Wideband.”

    https://www.telecompetitor.com/verizon-5g-home-fixed-service-goes-live-october-1-300-mbps-for-50-70/
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    “I think even Verizon is wondering how this will be received,” Stephenson said in an interview after his appearance at the Goldman Sachs Communacopia conference in New York Wednesday.

    Verizon will use high-frequency signals to beam broadband to select homes in Los Angeles, Houston and Indianapolis, and Sacramento, California, starting Oct. 1. The speeds will range up to 1 gigabit a second, with monthly prices starting at $50.

    But there’s a caveat: To get the service to market first, Verizon is using nonstandard 5G gear in its initial rollout. The company says it will used standardized equipment when it is available. The initial service also is aimed at household users, rather than mobile customers.

    “They are going to be first with a nonstandard service,” Stephenson said. “We will be first with a standards-based 5G service, and it will be mobile.”

    The tussle between AT&T and Verizon underscores the urgency to get ahead in 5G, which is seen as a driver of growth for the wireless industry. Companies throughout the supply chain are expected to spend an estimated $200 billion on 5G efforts, and the Trump administration has billed it a national priority as China expands its 5G capabilities.

    Stephenson downplayed reports that China was ahead of the U.S. in 5G development during a presentation to investors Wednesday. China has “trials” in progress, while U.S. wireless carriers are actively deploying commercial 5G services this year, he said.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-09-12/at-t-ceo-knocks-verizon-s-new-5g-service-as-not-really-5g

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