ZTE, China Telecom and China Unicom complete 5G co-build, co-share verification

ZTE Corporation, in partnership with China Telecom and China Unicom, has today completed the network verification based on the co-build, co-share mode in the commercial 5G environment, launching the world’s first NSA co-build co-share sites of 1.8 G/2.1 G/3.5 G in Hangzhou, China. That fully verifies the large-scale commercial capabilities of the 5G co-build co-share mode, and lays a solid foundation for greatly reducing initial investment in 5G and efficiently promoting 5G constructions.

The verification, based on the real 5G commercial network environment, covers the basic functions of network selection and anchor carrier triggering, network management functions of rights management and northbound interface in the data transmission environment, as well as multi-dimensional deep network sharing capability verification, such as multi-vendor, multi-operator mobility.

The co-build, co-share mode is capable of providing the broadband multi-operator 5G services on the same 5G base station, and reasonably allocating spectrum resources based on user requirements and service requirements. It fully demonstrates the system’s stability and outstanding performance, as well as its complete capacity for large-scale commercial use.

In addition, compared with the original construction strategy that each operator builds its own 5G networks, 5G co-build co-share sites across operators will effectively save investment in 5G networks. By promoting the sharing of infrastructure between operators, the co-build co-share mode can help operators build 5G networks with lower costs and more effective methods.

On September 9, 2019, China Telecom and China Unicom signed the 5G network co-build co-share framework cooperation agreement. As a strategic partner of China Telecom and China Unicom, ZTE fully supports their network construction and service operation. ZTE has innovatively proposed a flexible ultra-broadband spectrum application solution to support the co-build co-share mode, which helps reduce infrastructure construction costs, thereby further realizing the economic and social value of 5G.

In the future, ZTE will continue to partner with China Telecom and China Unicom to explore the applications of new 5G technologies in commercial networks, improve network quality, build more high-quality 4/5G networks, in a bid to provide users with better services.

ZTE is a provider of advanced telecommunications systems, mobile devices, and enterprise technology solutions to consumers, carriers, companies and public sector customers. As a part of ZTE’s strategy, the company is committed to providing customers with integrated end-to-end innovations to deliver excellence and values as the telecommunications and information technology sectors converge. Listed in the stock exchanges of Hong Kong and Shenzhen (H share stock code: 0763.HK / A share stock code: 000063.SZ), ZTE sells its products and services in more than 160 countries.

To date, ZTE has obtained 35 commercial 5G contracts in major markets, such as Europe, Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa (MEA). ZTE commits 10 percent of its annual revenues to research and development and takes leadership roles in international standard-setting organizations.

Image result for image of ZTE Corp

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ZTE and and Guangdong Branch of China Mobile have won Best Industry Solution Award from ICT by virtue of ZTE’s Common Edge solution at PT Expo China 2019:

Based on ZTE’s Common Edge platform, Guangdong branch of China Mobile and ZTE jointly piloted MEC edge computing services, conducting pre-commercial verification of the SA networking, construction mode, edge service application scenarios, and the cooperation mode with third parties.
ZTE’s Common Edge solution features converged access of wireless network and fixed network, which supports multiple systems  such as 4G, 5G, and WiFi, thereby building a unified fixed and mobile convergence platform.

Moreover, this solution supports cloud-based deployment and unified O&M. Embedded MEC, edge MEC and central cloud are deployed on the same base in a distribution mode. The dual-core (OpenStack+K8S) driving function provides efficient, flexible and flowing computing power, offering a unified edge cloud view and improving management efficiency. Based on AI engines, cloud-edge collaboration and edge-to-edge collaboration, the solution implements dynamic follow-up service flows and intelligent optimization of power. By means of unified management and local unattended O&M, this solution significantly reduces O&M costs.   In addition, this solution features embedded hardware in the site equipment room, such as IT BBU V9200 and TITAN C600, to implement zero-site and close-to-user deployment. With front wiring design, it is easy to maintain E5410/E5430 short chassis servers in the edge equipment room and compatible with mainstream acceleration hardware (GPU / FPGA / SmartNIC), supporting AI, image processing and video processing.

ZTE’s Common Edge solution revolutionizes the traditional closed telecom network architecture, and exposes the edge network infrastructure, hardware acceleration capability, edge network shunting capability and wireless network perception capability to the third-party applications, thereby helping various industries construct a win-win 5G ecosystem.
ZTE’s Common Edge solution has been widely used in the fields of industrial manufacturing, smart grid, Internet of Vehicles, entertainment & media, public safety, education, health, finance and agriculture. It focuses on industrial applications of wireless network capability exposure, big video, Internet of Vehicles, intelligent manufacturing and electric power. To date, by means of this solution, ZTE has carried out extensive cooperations and piloted with more than 100 strategic partners and over 200 industrial users to accelerate the penetration of 5G into various industries.
ZTE is a provider of advanced telecommunications systems, mobile devices, and enterprise technology solutions to consumers, carriers, companies and public sector customers. As a part of ZTE’s strategy, the company is committed to providing customers with integrated end-to-end innovations to deliver excellence and values as the telecommunications and information technology sectors converge. Listed in the stock exchanges of Hong Kong and Shenzhen (H share stock code: 0763.HK / A share stock code: 000063.SZ), ZTE sells its products and services in more than 160 countries.

References:

https://www.zte.com.cn/global/about/news/20191112e1.html

https://www.zte.com.cn/global/about/news/20191101e1

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “ZTE, China Telecom and China Unicom complete 5G co-build, co-share verification

  1. “That fully verifies the large-scale commercial capabilities of the 5G co-build/co-share mode, and lays a solid foundation for greatly reducing initial investment in 5G and efficiently promoting 5G constructions,” ZTE said.

    The verification, based on the real 5G commercial network environment, covers the basic functions of network selection and anchor carrier triggering, network management functions of rights management and northbound interface in the DT environment, as well as multi-dimensional deep network sharing capability verification, such as multi-vendor, multi-operator mobility, the company said.

    “The co-build/co-share mode is capable of providing the broadband multi-operator 5G services on the same 5G base station, and reasonably allocating spectrum resources based on user requirements and service requirements. It fully demonstrates the system’s stability and outstanding performance, as well as its complete capacity for large-scale commercial use,” ZTE added.

    Compared with the original construction strategy that each operator implement to deploy its own 5G networks, 5G co-build/co-share sites across operators will effectively save investment in 5G networks, ZTE added. “By promoting the sharing of infrastructure between operators, the co-build/co-share mode can help operators build 5G networks with lower costs and more effective methods,” the vendor said.

    In September, China Telecom and China Unicom signed the 5G network co-build co-share framework cooperation agreement. As a strategic partner of China Telecom and China Unicom, ZTE said it fully supports their network construction and service operation. “ZTE has innovatively proposed a flexible ultra-broadband spectrum application solution to support the co-build co-share mode, which helps reduce infrastructure construction costs, thereby further realizing the economic and social value of 5G.”

    https://www.rcrwireless.com/20191113/5g/zte-china-telecom-unicom-complete-5g-co-build-co-share-verification

  2. Huawei Is a Paralyzing Dilemma for the West–Western democracies are struggling to balance the geopolitical challenge of China with their need for 5G technology. A common approach is essential.

    Huawei, based in Shenzhen, is not owned by the state — being Chinese, it’s somewhere between collectively and privately owned. It was founded by Ren Zhengfei, who once worked as a researcher for the People’s Liberation Army. But he and his firm insist that Huawei never has built, nor ever would build, so-called “backdoors” into its equipment that would let it spy on, or sabotage, its customers’ networks.

    There are arguments for giving Huawei the benefit of the doubt. First, it tends to be cheaper than its rivals, which include the European companies Ericsson and Nokia Oyj. Second, it seems to be quicker. Earlier this year, Deutsche Telekom AG, a German cellphone operator, claimed that rolling out 5G without Huawei would delay its network by at least two years and add billions in cost.

    Then there’s the risk that excluding Huawei could antagonize China on trade and investment. In Germany, the bureaucracies opposed to Huawei are the spy agencies and the interior ministry, both tasked with security, whereas the economics ministry and the chancellery, both concerned with the overall Sino-German relationship, are more accommodating.

    Finally, there are the principles of fairness and economic openness. There’s no evidence that Huawei has spied on its customers. And part of what makes the West “western,” or at least liberal, is that it doesn’t close its markets to others without good reasons.

    Huawei’s critics, of course, have plenty of reasons for its exclusion. First, it’s implausible that any Chinese company can avoid becoming an arm of the state and the Communist Party. China’s National Intelligence Law of 2017 requires all the country’s companies to “assist” in national intelligence, and to keep that assistance secret. An earlier law defines national security as including economics and culture.

    Second, 5G isn’t any old phone network. Unlike 4G, it’s the infrastructure for machines and devices to talk to one another on the so-called Internet of Things. If it works well, it will make entire cities “smart” and enable autonomous cars to drive themselves through them, all the while exchanging reams of data. Think of the human body: If 4G is the ears, 5G is the entire nervous system. Would you want China to have control over it?

    The fear is not overblown. Whoever provides the software and hardware for 5G will also have a head-start in eventually transferring that prowess into 6G and 7G. And once a technology is baked in, a simple software update could turn a harmless feature into a mole. A banal analogy would be your smartphone, when its maker schedules an update that adds emoticons but suddenly seems to drain the battery much faster — and all of this coincidentally just before the launch of a new model.

    So caution is advisable. Even at the risk of slowing down the roll-out, regulators would be wise to assure diversity among suppliers. They should also ring-fence the most sensitive parts of the infrastructure. Procurement rules can’t discriminate against individual companies, but they should establish criteria of trustworthiness. Suppliers that can’t fully meet them would be allowed to play only in the network’s periphery.

    Just as important, the western allies must coordinate their approach. It makes little sense for, say, Denmark to exclude Huawei while Germany next door includes it. Autonomous cars, trucks and boats, geo-tagged goods in containers, patients with heart monitors: All of these and other connected nodes on the network will be moving across the border, constantly communicating with different “clouds” of server computers in the background. The data have to be safe on both sides of the border.

    The West and its allies must therefore come to a common position on Huawei — and ideally on both China and data security generally. 5G and its successors have an almost utopian potential to solve many human problems. They also have a dystopian potential to turn our freedoms into a surveillance hell. The democracies need to confront this reality.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2019-11-23/huawei-s-5g-networks-are-a-paralyzing-dilemma-for-the-west

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