WRC 19 Report: IMT in the frequency bands 24.25-27.5GHz & 45.5-47GHz

WRC 19 agenda item AI-1.13 concerns the frequencies to be used by International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), especially IMT 2020 (aka as standardized 5G).

1.13            To consider identification of frequency bands for the future development of International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), including possible additional allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis, in accordance with Resolution 238 (WRC-15);

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………

In a backgrounder paper, ITU states:

The implications of 5G for spectrum allocation, management and sharing are immense. ITU is working towards providing stable international regulations, sufficient spectrum and suitable standards for IMT2020 and the core network to enable successful 5G deployments at the regional and international levels.

Over the weekend, a WRC 19 drafting group generated two related documents, each dated November 17, 2019.  The editor/chair for this activity is Michael Kraemer of Intel- Dusseldorf, Germany.

1. DRAFT NEW RESOLUTION [COM4/X] (WRC‑19): Terrestrial component of International Mobile Telecommunications in the frequency band 24.25-27.5 GHz

  • Frequency options for 24.25-27.5GHz:

A number of different options were proposed for an IMT identification of the 24.25‑27.5 GHz frequency band with various different conditions. The text below for conditions A2b through A2g is a possible global compromise as middle ground between these proposals for further consideration.

[Editor’s note: The mobile except aeronautical mobile allocation is not supported by some participants and the option of a “full” mobile allocation is still under discussion]

ARTICLE 5

Frequency allocations

Section IV – Table of Frequency Allocations
(See No. 2.1)

MOD         AHG113/447/1#75679

22-24.75 GHz

Allocation to services
Region 1 Region 2 Region 3
24.25-24.45

FIXED

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

24.25-24.45

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

RADIONAVIGATION

24.25-24.45

FIXED

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

RADIONAVIGATION

24.45-24.65

FIXED

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

24.45-24.65

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

RADIONAVIGATION

24.45-24.65

FIXED

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

RADIONAVIGATION

5.533 5.533
24.65-24.75

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE
(Earth-to-space)  5.532B

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

24.65-24.75

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

RADIOLOCATION-
SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)

24.65-24.75

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE
(Earth-to-space)  5.532B

INTER-SATELLITE

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

5.533

 

MOD         AHG113/447/2#75680

24.75-29.9 GHz

Allocation to services
Region 1 Region 2 Region 3
24.75-25.25

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE
(Earth-to-space)  5.532B

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

24.75-25.25

FIXED-SATELLITE
(Earth-to-space)  5.535

MOBILE [except aeronautical mobile]  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

24.75-25.25

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE
(Earth-to-space)  5.535

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

25.25-25.5                                              FIXED

INTER-SATELLITE  5.536

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)

25.5-27                                                    EARTH EXPLORATION-SATELLITE (space-to Earth)  MOD 5.536B

FIXED

INTER-SATELLITE  5.536

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

SPACE  RESEARCH (space-to-Earth)  5.536C

Standard frequency and time signal-satellite (Earth-to-space)

MOD 5.536A

27-27.5

FIXED

INTER-SATELLITE  5.536

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

27-27.5

FIXED

FIXED-SATELLITE (Earth-to-space)

INTER-SATELLITE  5.536  5.537

MOBILE  ADD 5.A113  MOD 5.338A

The frequency band 24.25-27.5 GHz is identified for use by administrations wishing to implement the terrestrial component of International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). This identification does not preclude the use of this frequency band by any application of the services to which it is allocated and does not establish priority in the Radio Regulations.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

2. DRAFT NEW RESOLUTION [COM4/x] (WRC‑19): International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) in the frequency band 45.5-47 GHz

This draft resolution suggests sharing between IMT and MSS (Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth) in the frequency band 45.5-47 GHz.  That spectrum is MUCH HIGHER then the mmWave frequencies previously considered for IMT 2020.

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

The World Radiocommunication Conference (Sharm el-Sheikh, 2019), considering:

  1. a) that International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), including IMT-2000, IMT‑Advanced and IMT-2020, is intended to provide telecommunication services on a worldwide scale, regardless of location and type of network or terminal;
  2. b) that the evolution of IMT is being studied within ITU‑R;
  3. c) that adequate and timely availability of spectrum and supporting regulatory provisions is essential to realize the objectives in Recommendation ITU‑R M.2083;
  4. d) that there is a need to continually take advantage of technological developments in order to increase the efficient use of spectrum and facilitate spectrum access;
  5. e) that IMT systems are now being evolved to provide diverse usage scenarios and applications such as enhanced mobile broadband, massive machine-type communications and ultra-reliable and low-latency communications;
  6. f) that ultra-low latency and very high bit-rate applications of IMT will require larger contiguous blocks of spectrum than those available in frequency bands that are currently identified for use by administrations wishing to implement IMT;
  7. g) that the properties of higher frequency bands, such as shorter wavelength, would better enable the use of advanced antenna systems including MIMO and beam-forming techniques in supporting enhanced broadband;
  8. h) that harmonized worldwide bands for IMT are desirable in order to achieve global roaming and the benefits of economies of scale;

[i)                that studies in preparation for WRC‑19 have indicated that sharing between IMT and MSS (Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth) in the frequency band 45.5-47 GHz is feasible,]

noting:  Recommendation ITU‑R M.2083 “IMT Vision –Framework and overall objectives of the future development of IMT for 2020 and beyond”,

recognizing:  that the identification of a frequency band for IMT does not establish priority in the Radio Regulations and does not preclude the use of the frequency band by any application of the services to which it is allocated,

resolves: [Note: align the conditions in resolves part with the relevant conditions from new Resolution(s) on 40.5-43.5 GHz and/or 66-71 GHz frequency band(s).]

1.                that administrations wishing to implement IMT consider the use of frequency band 45.5-47 GHz, identified for IMT in No. 5.F113 and the benefits of harmonized utilization of the spectrum for the terrestrial component of IMT taking into account the latest relevant ITU‑R Recommendation;]

2.                that, when deploying outdoor base stations in the frequency band 45.5-47 GHz, identified for IMT in No. 5.F113, all potential measures shall be taken to keep the electrical tilt of IMT base stations beams to be not higher than 0 degrees relative to horizontal and the mechanical tilt of IMT base stations be below −10 degrees relative to the horizon;

3.                 that the IMT base stations antenna pattern should be kept within the limits of approximation envelope according to Recommendation ITU‑R M.2101;

4.                 that the IMT base stations shall comply with the limits given in Tables 1 and 2:

Table 1

TRP1 limits for IMT base stations

Frequency bands dB(W/200 MHz)
45.5‑47 GHz −4
1     The total radiated power (TRP) is to be understood here as the integral of the power transmitted from all antenna elements in different directions over the entire radiation sphere.

Table 2

e.i.r.p. [1.] limits for IMT base stations

Elevation angle Maximum e.i.r.p. dB(W/200 MHz)
5 ≤ θ ≤ 15 17 − 1.3(θ − 5)
15 < θ ≤ 25 4
25 < θ ≤ 55 4 − 0.43(θ − 25)
55 < θ ≤ 90 −8.9

Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) is the product of transmitter power and the antenna gain in a given direction relative to an isotropic antenna of a radio transmitter. Normally the EIRP is given in dBi, or decibels over isotropic.

……………………………………………………………………………………..

ITU‑R is invited:

1                to develop harmonized frequency arrangements to facilitate IMT deployment in the frequency band 45.5-47 GHz;]

2                 to continue providing guidance to ensure that IMT can meet the telecommunication needs of the developing countries in the context of the studies referred to above.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………

References:

Preview of WRC‑19: Enabling Global Radiocommunications via Radio Frequency Spectrum and Satellite Orbit Resources

GSMA: 5G mmWave activities at WRC 19

https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/Conferences/GSR/2019/Documents/Background_paper_Preparing%20for%20WRC19.pdf

https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/conferences/wrc/2019/Pages/default.aspx

 

 

13 thoughts on “WRC 19 Report: IMT in the frequency bands 24.25-27.5GHz & 45.5-47GHz

  1. Agenda Item 1.13. This seeks to examine proposals for 5G mobile to use additional bands in higher frequencies than the mobile industry previously had the technology to use. It may be the first of many such requirements given the burgeoning demand from the mobile sector. The GSA’s Joe Barrett points out, “Spectrum for 5G above 6 GHz is a key component of WRC-19 and GSA is representing the mobile supplier ecosystem in cooperation with the mobile operator association, GSMA, to support the allocation of enough harmonized spectrum to make sure 5G services can be delivered and customer expectations can be met.”

    He continues: “Access to a broad range of spectrum resource is the main growth driver for the deployment of wireless services; conversely spectrum can also be a limiting factor for the expansion of wireless broadband into new markets and industries. GSA therefore advocates that a range of frequency bands should be made available for mobile broadband including the low-band (below 2 GHz), mid-band (2 GHz to 6 GHz) and high-band (above 6 GHz).”

    Moreover, it will need to be available in specific configurations. “GSA recommends that at least 1 GHz of spectrum, ideally contiguous, is made available per network, from high-bands to support the full range of coverage and capacity needs that are, and will be, demanded by public organizations, private businesses, and consumers,” says Mr. Barrett. “Commercial deployments in the U.S. are underway, and Korea and Japan services are planned to start in 2020. Many other countries are in the process of planning to license high-bands following WRC-19.”
    ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….
    Additional Spectrum For IMT-2020 Networks Otherwise Known as 5G:
    5G is expected to connect people, things, data, applications, transport systems, and cities in smart networked communication environments. It should transport a huge amount of data much faster, reliably connect an extremely large number of devices, and process very high volumes of data with minimal delay.

    https://www.ptc.org/2019/10/wrc-19-how-will-we-regulate-the-global-multi-trillion-dollar-wireless-ecosystem/

  2. 5G/IMT 2020 Spectrum bands under study (AI 1.13):

    Existing mobile allocation/ No global mobile allocation
    24.25 – 27.5 GHz/ 31.8 – 33.4 GHz
    37 – 40.5 GHz/ 40.5 – 42.5 GHz
    42.5 – 43.5 GHz
    45.5 – 47 GHz/ 47 – 47.2 GHz
    47.2 – 50.2 GHz
    50.4 – 52.6 GHz
    66 – 76 GHz
    81 – 86 GHz
    ……………………………………………………………………………
    24.25-27.5 GHz is a clear priority for immediate study within CEPT.

    RCC Administrations consider it reasonable to perform studies on IMT system compatibility first of all in the frequency bands 24.25 – 27.5 GHz, 31.8 – 33.4 GHz and 40.5-42.5 GHz and 66 – 71 GHz, where global harmonization could be achieved.

    https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/seminars/rrs/RRS-17-Americas/Documents/Forum/9_ITU%20Diana%20Tomimura.pdf

  3. What: Identifying 24.25-27.5 GHz for IMT.
    Why: Potential for global harmonisation to boost mmWave 5G leading to early deployment.
    How: For the 26 GHz band, support for IMT starts with Method A2, Alternative 2: allocate 24.25-25.25 GHz to mobile on a primary basis in Regions 1 and 2 and identify 24.25-27.5 GHz to IMT.

    Unwanted emission limits will be established for IMT stations to protect EESS (passive) in the adjacent band at 23.6-24 GHz. Sharing studies for Conditions related to FSS and ISS such as A2e have shown large positive margins: no condition is necessary here.

    https://www.gsma.com/spectrum/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Enabling-IMT-at-WRC-19.pdf

  4. One of the biggest tasks for WRC-19 is to identify additional spectrum suitable for 5G. Securing 5G spectrum in the millimeter wave bands is the top U.S. priority at the Conference. Global harmonization of this part of the spectrum will enable economies of scale, lowering deployment costs for providers and device costs for consumers. The United States, along with regional partners in the Americas, are championing an approach to 5G that will promote global harmonization and flexibility to deploy 5G in this range of spectrum. This approach is consistent with U.S. leadership in spectrum policy: we consistently work to find new ways to more efficiently use and share spectrum and create opportunities for innovative new technologies. We do this while also ensuring necessary protections for other services that may occupy the same spectrum.

    But 5G is not the only game in town. The agenda for WRC-19 offers the promise of connectivity in many different forms – from earth stations in motion (ESIM) and high-altitude platform systems (HAPS) to non-geostationary orbit (NGSO) mega-constellation satellite systems, as well as enhanced Wi-Fi connectivity. All of these services and applications require updates to the Radio Regulations to launch and bring their innovative products to the four billion people who still lack connectivity, and are potential tools to support broadband connectivity in rural and remote areas, a priority for the United States.

    https://blogs.state.gov/stories/2019/11/18/en/us-leadership-ensures-we-all-benefit-global-connectivity

  5. Allocation of additional spectrum (agenda item 1.13)

    Agenda item 1.13 considers additional spectrum allocation for terrestrial mobile services. As some of the spectrum blocks which could be allocated to mobile services are currently used for satellite services, the outcomes of this agenda item will be of interest to the satellite industry. The consequences will be particularly significant this year as there is demand for new spectrum allocations for terrestrial mobile services for the deployment of 5G, including the harmonisation of frequency bands for future 5G services above 24 GHz. As the GSMA noted in an open letter, WRC-19 is a critical step which “will determine whether – and when – the promise of 5G will be fully realised.”

    It will be important for regulators to strive for a balance between the needs of incumbent and new mobile operators and satellite operators under this agenda item, especially in the context of 5G.

    https://www.twobirds.com/en/news/articles/2019/global/the-implications-of-wrc-19-for-the-satellite-industry

  6. WRC 19 Update for Region 2 (includes U.S.): 50.4-52.6 GHz band

    Options for the 50.4-52.6 GHz include no change to the Radio Regulations and a global IMT identification for the full frequency band. The text below contains the proposal to identify the frequency band for IMT, which was not considered and agreed in the Ad-Hoc Group on agenda item 1.13 and is submitted for further consideration by Committee 4.

    The frequency band 50.4-52.6 GHz is identified for use by administrations wishing to implement the terrestrial component of International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). This identification does not preclude the use of this frequency band by any application of the services to which it is allocated and does not establish priority in the Radio Regulations. Resolution 750 (Rev.WRC 19) applies. (WRC 19)

  7. WRC 19 Update for 47.2-50.2 GHz band (only the 47.2-48.2 GHz part being considered for IMT in all 3 regions)

    Options for the 47.2-50.2 GHz frequency band include no change to the Radio Regulations and a global IMT identification for the full frequency band. The text below is a possible compromise as middle ground between these proposals to identify only the 47.2-48.2 GHz part for further consideration by Committee 4.

    The frequency band 47.2-48.2 GHz is identified for use by administrations wishing to implement International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT). This identification does not preclude the use of this frequency band by any application of the services to which it is allocated, and does not establish any priority in the Radio Regulations. [Administrations are invited, when deploying IMT in this band, to take necessary steps to ensure protection of FSS earth stations][The IMT shall not claim protection from the FSS nor cause interference to the FSS and the TRP for the IMT base station shall not exceed −4 dB(W/200 MHz) and comply with Recommendation ITU-R M.2101.] (WRC-19)

  8. Regarding the notification of IMT stations operating in the frequency band [24.45-27.5 GHz], which use an antenna that consists of an array of active elements [aka active antenna system (AAS)], the verification of No. 21.5 shall be calculated as follows:

    1) For a necessary bandwidth of 200 MHz or less:
    • The power delivered to the antenna = TRP + [TRP conversion factor]

    2) For a necessary bandwidth of more than 200 MHz:
    • The power delivered to the antenna = TRP + [TRP conversion factor] − 10log (necessary bandwidth/200 MHz) (dB).

    NOTE: a definition for total radiated power (TRP) in Article 1, as well as the amendment of No. 21.5 is needed to address the stations with an active antenna system (AAS).

  9. Negotiators from around the world announced a deal Friday at a meeting in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, for how to roll out 5G technology that operates using specific radio frequency bands.

    Studies completed before the negotiations by U.S. government agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA and the Navy had warned that 5G equipment operating in the 24-gigahertz frequency band could interfere with transmissions from polar-orbiting satellites used to gather weather data. This could make forecasts much less reliable, the reports found.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/11/22/global-g-deal-poses-significant-threat-weather-forecast-accuracy-experts-warn/

  10. Negotiators from around the world announced a deal Friday at a meeting in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, for how to roll out 5G technology that operates using specific radio frequency bands.

    Studies completed before the negotiations by U.S. government agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA and Specifically, these highly technical analyses concluded that if deployed widely and without adequate constraints, telecommunications equipment operating in the 24 GHz frequency band would bleed into the frequencies that NOAA and NASA satellite sensors also use to sense the presence and properties of water vapor in the atmosphere, significantly interfering with the collection and transmission of critical weather data.

    The NOAA report, for example, warned of a potential loss of 77.4 percent of data coming from microwave sounders mounted on the agency’s polar-orbiting satellites.

    The agency’s microwave sounders operate at a frequency of 23.6 to 24 GHz, which is close to the frequency that the Federal Communications Commission auctioned off the use of for about $2 billion beginning this past March.

    The key concerns about 5G interference focus on what are known as baseline interference limits, often referred to as out-of-band emission limits. Navy had warned that 5G equipment operating in the 24-gigahertz frequency band could interfere with transmissions from polar-orbiting satellites used to gather weather data. This could make forecasts much less reliable, the reports found.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/11/22/global-g-deal-poses-significant-threat-weather-forecast-accuracy-experts-warn/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

*

 
 

 

Recent Posts