Big Names Clash over 12 GHz for 5G despite it NOT being included in ITU M.1036 – Frequency Arrangements for IMT

Light Reading’s Mike Dano, says there is a contentious issue of  whether 5G networks should be permitted to use the 12 GHz band.  Apparently, the clash is between Charlie Erdogan’s Dish Network and Dell (YES) vs AT&T and Elon Musk’s SpaceX (NO).

Interestingly, 12 GHz (more precisely 12.2-12.7 GHz Band ) is NOT one of the frequency bands in the revision to ITU Recommendation M.1036-6, which specifies ALL frequency bands for the TERRESTRIAL component of IMT (including IMT 2020).

–>Please refer to Editor’s Note below for more on the M.1036 revision which may contain a cop-out clause to permit use of any frequency for IMT 2020.SPECS. Mike Dano wrote:

According to at least one high-level source involved in the debates, the FCC might make some kind of ruling on the topic as soon as December. A senior FCC official confirmed that the agency is considering allowing 5G in 12GHz, but declined to comment on whether the item would be addressed during the FCC’s December meeting.  Based on the increasingly contentious filings on the topic, it certainly appears that the fight over 12GHz is escalating.

In the U.S., the FCC exhaustively licensed the 12.2-12.7 GHz band in 2004-2005 timeframe through competitive bidding. The US terrestrial fixed licenses are co-primary with Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS) and Non-Geostationary Orbit Fixed Satellite Service (NGSO FSS). In April 2016, a petition was filed seeking license modifications under section 316 to permit terrestrial mobile use in the band. Although the petition went through public notice/comment phases, no decisive action has been taken yet. Meanwhile, in August, 2017, FCC issued an inquiry into new opportunities in the mid-band spectrum between 3.7 GHz and 24 GHz. The combination of favorable propagation characteristics (as compared to bands above 24 GHz) and the opportunity for additional channel bandwidth (as compared to bands below 3.7 GHz), raises the potential of these bands to be used for next generation wireless services.

“The time has finally come for the commission to issue a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM),” wrote RS Access this week in a filing to the FCC. Dell’s private money management firm backs RS Access, which owns 12GHz licenses and has been pushing for rules allowing 5G operations in the band.  An NPRM by the FCC would signal a formal effort to decide on the matter, potentially sometime next year.

“Given the twin national imperatives of bringing spectrum to its highest and best use while unleashing spectrum for broadband connectivity, issuing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will allow debate to move from hollow rhetoric to the types of pragmatic solutions the country needs to accelerate 5G investment and innovation,” echoed Dish Network in its FCC filing.

AT&T and SpaceX are firmly against the idea of the FCC taking action. Instead, they argue that 5G operations in the 12 GHz band would affect their existing activities in 12GHz (AT&T’s DirecTV satellite TV service uses a portion of the band, as does SpaceX’s Starlink satellite Internet service).

“The parties urged the commission to deny the MVDDS Petition [a coalition including Dish and RS Access] for rulemaking outright or, at most, to issue a notice of inquiry rather than a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking given the current state of the record in this proceeding,” wrote AT&T and SpaceX – along with Amazon’s Kepler Communications, satellite companies Intelsat and SES, and bankrupt OneWeb – in their joint FCC filing. A note at the end stated: “See MVDDS 5G Coalition Petition for Rulemaking to Permit MVDDS Use of the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band for Two-Way Mobile Broadband Service, RM-11768 (filed Apr. 26, 2016) (“MVDDS Petition”).”

12 GHz proponents were hoping the FCC would discuss that issue at its November meeting.  That’s unlikely as the main agenda item for that meeting will be to free up the 5.9GHz band for unlicensed operations as well as vehicle-to-vehicle communications using the C-V2X standard.

Dano concludes as follows:

The heavyweights involved in the 12 GHz proceeding are pulling out all the stops in the hopes they can get the FCC to act on one last contentious piece of spectrum policy before Biden begins his first term or President Trump begins his second. After all, Trump’s current FCC chairman, Pai, has not said whether he will stay on at the agency for Trump’s second term.

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Editor’s Note:  IMT 2020 Frequency Free for All?

At the conclusion of its Oct 2020 meeting, ITU-R WP5D could NOT agree on revision of draft recommendation M.1036-6 which specifies frequency arrangements to be used with the terrestrial component of IMT, including IMT 2020.SPECS. So that document has yet to be sent to ITU-R SG5 for approval.

The 5D Frequency Aspects WG Oct 2020  report stated:
“The current version of the draft revision with these further proposed edits is contained in document 5D/TEMP/243(Rev.1) and Editor’s Notes have been included in the document to clarify the current situation.”

“Looking at the current situation with some of the critical and urgent deliverables of WG Spectrum Aspects & WRC-23 Preparations, it is clear that whilst progress has been made in some less controversial areas, there are a significant number of areas where very diverging and sometimes polarized views remain. It is the view of the WG Chair that the current situation with such polarized views and no room for compromise solutions is disappointing and that we cannot continue with this approach at the next meeting if we want to be successful in completing these critical outputs by the required deadlines. We must all put more efforts into finding efficient ways to advance the discussions and in particular to focus on middle ground and compromise solutions rather than repeating initial positions.”

Furthermore, the UNAPPROVED draft revision to M.1036-6 has several cop-outs.  For example:
“That Recommendations ITU‑R M.1457, ITU‑R M.2012 and ITU‑R M.[IMT-2020.SPECS] contain external references to information on operating bands for IMT technologies which may go beyond the information in Recommendation ITU-R М.1036 and may cover broader frequency ranges as well as further uplink/downlink combinations” OR for ONLY IMT 2020.SPECS:

“That Recommendations ITU‑R M.[IMT-2020.SPECS] contains external references to information on operating bands for IMT technologies which may go beyond the information in Recommendation М.1036 and may cover broader frequency ranges as well as further uplink/downlink combinations.”

Note also, that the hotly debated 12 GHz frequency band the Dish and Dell are proposing for 5G is NOT contained in the draft revision to ITU-R M.1036-6.  But the cop-out disclaimer above, would permit 12 GHz and any other frequency to be used for IMT 2020, which would obviously negate the purpose and intent of that ITU recommendation.

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References:

https://www.lightreading.com/iot/5g-skirmishes-at-12ghz-may-escalate-into-all-out-spectrum-war/d/d-id/765009?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5g-spectrum-series-what-happening-12-ghz-shahed-mazumder/?articleId=6698577775151915008

5 thoughts on “Big Names Clash over 12 GHz for 5G despite it NOT being included in ITU M.1036 – Frequency Arrangements for IMT

  1. StarLink just released their initial pricing offer, I think yesterday, and their internet services will be starting at $99 a month, which is a steal where I’m at.

    1. Where “are you at” Chad? In Santa Clara, CA where I live, you can get high speed Internet from many independent wireless ISPs using Line of Sight mmWave with a rooftop antenna. Your only other choices are Comcast or AT&T (the latter has limited AT&T Fiber availability)

    2. Starlink appears to have begun accepting some beta customers onto its low-Earth orbit (LEO) satellite Internet service, offering speeds of between 50 Mbit/s to 150 Mbit/s for $99 per month.
      The company is outlining the basics of its service in emails to prospective customers under the “Better Than Nothing Beta program” heading, according to a CNBC report that dovetails with user posts to the Reddit website. However, Starlink – the LEO broadband operation of space-faring company SpaceX – did not return requests for comment, according to CNBC.
      http://www.broadbandworldnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=764957&

  2. Well, this is an interesting development. Clearly, the 12 GHz propagation characteristics wouldn’t be as good as the C-Band, but it would be better than the 38 GHz that Verizon is using for their Ultra-Wideband 5G network. There may be a free-for-all in terms of worldwide spectrum standardization, but the big question is where are the devices?

    Would Apple create a phone for this frequency band, given that it doesn’t look like there would be support for it from the big 3 wireless companies?

  3. This article is very informative. I appreciate your efforts and the information shared in this post, especially that 12 GHz is NOT an ITU-R approved frequency for 5G/IMT 2020. Thanks a lot.

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