FTTP build out boom continues: AT&T and Google Fiber now offer Gig speeds to residential/business customers

AT&T  has extended its symmetrical 2-Gig and 5-Gig to parts of its full fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) footprint.  The expansion (the full list can be viewed here) follows AT&T’s initial launch of multi-gig services to more than 70 US markets.

AT&T said this expansion includes parts of its fiber footprint spanning more than 100 U.S. metro areas.

AT&T Fiber and their Hyper-Gig speeds will be introduced to 7 all-new fiber metro areas in Texas, Oklahoma and Ohio by year-end 2022. Customers in these areas can sign up to be alerted when AT&T Fiber is available to their address through the company’s Notify Me service by visiting att.com/notifyme.

AT&T said it will continue to expand multi-gig capabilities inside its FTTP footprint in 2022, and reiterated plans to expand fiber to more than 30 million customer locations by the end of 2025. Markets on tap for fiber builds include Abilene, Tyler, Victoria, Wichita Falls, and Longview, Texas; Lawton, Oklahoma; and Youngstown, Ohio.

Pricing on AT&T’s new multi-gig remain at the levels announced last month:

  • Residential 2-Gig for $110 per month, or business 2-Gig for $225 per month
  • Residential 5-Gig for $180 per month, or business 5-Gig for $395 per month

“We’re thrilled to bring our fastest speeds and our best internet experience to more homes and businesses across the country,” said Rick Welday, Executive Vice President & GM of Broadband, AT&T. “The energy and momentum we have in the marketplace is unmistakable and we are proud to be bringing connectivity to more people every single day.”

“The importance of high-speed broadband internet service has never been clearer,” said Bob O’Donnell, President of TECHnalysis Research. “Whether it’s ongoing hybrid work efforts with bandwidth-hungry video meetings, increasing reliance on high-resolution streaming video content, growing interest in online gaming and more, US consumers recognize the need and value of high-quality internet. Multi-gig fiber ups the ante and answers those demands with faster, reliable, symmetrical download and upload speeds.”

AT&T Fiber is internet that upgrades everything! There’s a big difference in the architectural nature of fiber compared to cable. Cable was designed to provide TV content to households, while fiber was designed specifically to provide high-speed internet. Fiber allows high-capacity tasks, such as uploading large documents during video calls and gaming, to flow seamlessly, even during high-usage times.

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AT&T’s gig FTTP  offering comes as  Frontier Communications, Verizon Communications and Ziply Fiber, get more aggressive with their own multi-gig offerings.  Cablecos like CableOne,Suddenlink Communications (asubsidiary of Altice USA), and Comcast/Xfinity are also offering gig download speeds to residential subscribers.

FTTX (Node, Curb, Building, Home) architectures vary with regard to the distance between the optical fiber and the end user. The building on the left is the central office; the building on the right is one of the buildings served by the central office. Dotted rectangles represent separate living or office spaces within the same building.

Source: Wikipedia

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Meanwhile, long dormant (and presumed dead) Google Fiber has moved ahead with the debut of a top-tier broadband service for business users that delivers 2 Gbit/s downstream and 1 Gbit/s upstream.  Google Fiber’s Webpass fixed wireless services currently deliver up to 1 Gbit/s.  Business 2 Gig is available to any business address in any Google Fiber service area. You can Sign up today to see where truly fast, affordable internet can take your business!

Google Fiber’s new business tier costs $250 per month.  It’s being bundled with a static IP address (for components such as web and email servers), a Wi-Fi 6 router and a tri-band mesh extender. The new 2-Gig business tier sells for the same price previously affixed to Google Fiber’s 1-Gig service for business, which has been reduced to $100 per month.

Google Fiber introduced its $100 per month, 2-Gig residential service in the fall of 2020, and initially tested it in Nashville, Tennessee, and Huntsville, Alabama. The company has since launched 2-Gig in other FTTP markets, including Atlanta; Austin; Charlotte, North Carolina; San Antonio; Kansas City (Missouri and Kansas); Orange County; Provo and Salt Lake City, Utah; The Triangle, North Carolina. Google Fiber is in the process of launching services in West Des Moines, Iowa, where it tangles with Mediacom Communications.

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References:

https://about.att.com/story/2022/expands-hyper-gig-fiber-offering.html

https://about.att.com/ecms/dam/pages/internet-fiber/ATT-Fiber-market-cities.pdf

For more information or to check availability for all speed tiers of AT&T Fiber, visit att.com/hypergig

https://fiber.google.com/blog/2022/your-business-now-even-faster/

Ziply Fiber deploys 2 Gig & 5 Gig fiber internet tiers in 60 cities – AT&T can now top that!

Analysts: Increased Fiber internet services may force cablecos to alter pricing & deploy FTTP

Frontier Communications reports added 45,000 fiber broadband subscribers in 4Q-2021 – best in 5 years!

 

How to find the Best Gigabit Internet Providers in the USA

 

One thought on “FTTP build out boom continues: AT&T and Google Fiber now offer Gig speeds to residential/business customers

  1. That is a cool graphic showing the distinction between the various last-mile fiber configurations. It’s great to see fiber to the home become a reality for more and more households. There is still a long ways to go, but the momentum seems to be on the side of a fiber-deep infrastructure.

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